Tent Camping Essentials List

posted in: Camping Gifts, Camping Recreation | 0

Want to get started camping, but don’t know where to start?  Preparing for a camping trip can be daunting. However, starting with a tent camping essentials list will make it a heck of a lot easier!

About this Checklist

Content: I have this broken down into the specific categories- and then list several recommended items for some of them.  At the end of this content are checklists that are in a bulleted format.  Feel free to use the Table of Contents (below) to go to specific information.

Purchase: After some of the items, you will see a link which goes either to Etsy or Amazon. I make a small commission from the items purchased from these two companies.  I have provided other links to stores like Cabelas, etc. still because well, they have quality products!

Having these links help me to keep AZ Camping Experience up and running; your purchases through Amazon or Etsy are greatly appreciated!

Reviews:  This is a pretty new website- so I am still working my way through reviewing gear.  There are a few links from the items I mention to the  review on my website.

Accommodations

Having shelter is the most important part of any camping trip. The best investment you can make is in a high quality tent that is durable, can easily be set up and taken down, can withstand high winds and is weatherproof.

 

The Tent

Without a doubt, the choices for selecting tents can be completely overwhelming.  Here are 3 different quality tents to choose from:

The Coleman Sundome: This tent is perfect for the beginner camper and if you don’t want to spend too much money. For the price, it’s well built and will keep you dry in a down pour.

 

As many of you know- it’s important to read reviews before purchasing.  Amazon has the most extensive reviews I know of.  Sometimes- I come across reviews that I can’t help but share.  Here are two if you need a good laugh today.

1st place Amazon Q&A:

Question:

Can you ship to Paris? how much will it dust?

Answer:

Sadly, it will not dust at all. It also will not vacuum, polish the furniture, or do windows. Wish I had known that when I bought the thing. Way to pricey for an item with no ambition!

Runner Up -Amazon Q&A

Question:

Rain

Answer:

Rain is what happens when the water in the atmosphere precipitates into visible drops. Was that your question?  Assuming that you were asking whether the tent is waterproof the answer is yes, though like all tents it benefits from the occasional application of waterproofing spray, especially along the seams.

 

  • Cabela’s Alaskan Guide:  This is one of the main brands we use in our camps.  I slept in a new one just last week.  It’s very large and you can stand up in it.  It is great for a large family or if someone is very tall.   This tent has drink holders and  stays well insulated.  I get cold easily and I actually woke up warm in 40 degree weather. The image below is the tent that is set up for our White Mountain camp. The only downside is that due to the color it’s a bit dark inside.   I will be doing a full review on this tent- so stay tuned!

 

 

  • Big Agnes Blacktail 2 –  This tent is much smaller – it can only hold  1-2 people.  It is durable, lightweight and affordable. Perfect for canoe or hiking trips

Tent Repair Kit -The Coleman Tent Repair Kit will save your day should you get any rips or tears in your tent. Don’t wait until you have the emergency- it’s a good idea to have it ahead of time.

Tent Footprint – An 8×10 tarp will keep your tent from getting tears and holes in the bottom from sticks and rocks.  It will also keep your tent floor dry in case it rains.

Stake Hammer – It is much easier to use a stake hammer than a rock or your shoe.

Stakes – On one of the AZ family campouts- I set up my tent and then did not stake it down.  The wind picked it up and it went rolling down the meadow. Can you say embarrassing?  Purchase: Coleman Stake Hammer

Dust Pan/Brush – When I camp with my kids, the tent gets debris and dirt within hours.  I’m not a clean freak- but this is very annoying. With a small brush and dust pan you can keep your tent looking nice and tidy.  Once you are finished camping – If your tent is small enough, once you have everything out of it you can just pick it up and turn it upside down.

Tent Rug – If you have the extra room, it is nice to have rugs outside and inside your tent.  It does cut down on the debris that is brought in and when you have the rugs inside, it can also protect the bottom of the tent.

Sleeping Bag

The key to being a camping beauty and to having a great time is to get quality shut eye.  One of my first camping trips in ID- I did not have the correct sleeping bag.  I was freezing the entire night and did not sleep a wink.  I remember we spent the entire day hiking to various mountain lakes and I was tired the entire day.  Here are two recommendations:

         –Big Agnes 30 Degree Sleeping Bag– Integrates nicely with Big Agnes sleeping pad.

Sierra Design Bed Style Sleeping Bag- Comfortable, practical and perfect for the camper                     looking for a durable bag made with DriDown.

Sleeping Pad – Insulated pads like Klymit will keep your warmer and they are compact. Here’s how you can stay warm on those cold nights.

Pillow – This one seems obvious, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve forgotten mine.  I like to have pillows that I use specifically for camping.

Sleeping Cot – If you’re looking for something different, The Kamp Rite Tent Cot can be a lot of fun.  For those of you that have trouble sleeping on the ground, this could be exactly what you’re looking for.

Air Mattress – Different from a sleeping pad because they are heavier and much larger.  If you have room though, they can be super comfy.

Extra Blankets

Clothing

I prefer functionality vs. fashion.  I know of a lady that wears tennis skorts when she goes camping and wears a bow in her hair.  I think this is great-because her personality is reflected in what she wears.  The clothes you wear also depends on your body temperature.  The last camp I was on in the evening- I wore long sleeve shirts, my fleece, and hiking pants. Some of the kids stayed in their t-shirts and shorts and they were not cold.

  • Long Pants
  • Thermal Underwear
  • Hiking Boots
  • Shorts
  • Socks
  • T-Shirts – The Ibex W2 Sport T is made from weightless wool- and is soft, durable, and breathable.
  • Sweat Shirt
  • Long Sleeve Shirts – Ibex also makes long sleeves
  • Rain Jacket
  • Bandana
  • Water Shoes/Sandals – It’s always a good idea to bring along shoes that can get wet.  You can wear the water shoes or sandals when you’re fishing along the creek, around the campsite, or potty runs during the middle of the night.    They allow your feet to breath and dry quickly too. My kids always find a creek to jump into…feet could stay damp all day if you’re out playing away from camp.
  • Bathing Suit
  • Beach Towel
  • Bag for Dirty Clothes – Dry Sacks are available or you can keep it simple and just bring extra plastic bags with you.

 

Other Essential Camping Gear

  • Backback – I always bring a backpack with me when I go camping. Aside from hiking, I also use a backpack for our different outings – I  keep snacks, water, sunscreen, and first aid kit with me always.
  • Water Filter – So many choices when it comes to water filters. A brand that I prefer is Vapur Microfilter Water Bottle.  With this filter, you can drink from almost any water source, it’s compact, and weighs little.
  • Flashlight/Head Lamp
  • Lantern – Check out my review on the Streamlight Seige.
  • Bug Spray
  • Pocket Knife
  • Duct Tape
  • Solar Charger
  • Compass
  • Folding Table
  • Portable Toilet – The slogan here should be – “Never Go Camping w/Out it”. Having one of these at camp is the best!  For our youth camps, we set up an official porty potty- because our camps are for extended amounts of time.  We re-purpose a Cabelas Shower Tent- and place over the porta potty.

AZ Camping Toilet

  • Rope
  • Thermacell – A lantern that has mosquito stopping power; how cool is that!
  • Chairs – There are times when a picnic table is at your campsite- but it’s always nice to have extra chairs. Check out these chairs from Etsy if you want to personalize!

Personalized camping chairs

 

Personal Items

  • Toiletries – If you are looking for something compact- here is an adorable carry case.
  • Water Bottle
  • Sunscreen
  • Glasses
  • Soap/shampoo

 

Camping Safety

  • First Aid Kit
  • Emergency Water Filter
  • Bug Ointment

Cooking

  • Cooler
  • Portable Grill
  • Cookware
  • Cooking Oil
  • Utensils
  • Cubs/Bowls
  • Coffee Pot
  • Camp Kitchen
  • Dutch Oven
  • Cooking Oil
  • Aluminum Foil
  • Trash Bags
  • Water Container
  • Fuel
  • Paper Towels
  • Biodegradable Dish Soap

 

Fire

  • Fire Starting Kit
  • Firewood –
  • Water Proof Matches

Activities

  • Photography –  For those who’ve camped with me, they know how annoying I can be with the camera.  I can’t get enough pics of hiking and camping.
  • Water Toys
  • Footballs & Frisbees
  • Cards
  • Books
  • Board Games
  • Disc Golf

 

Suggested Grocery List (2-3 Days)

I realize this is a very basic list- which some would appreciate.  If you don’t have time to prepare gourmet lunches or dinners you will find this useful.

Lunch 

  • Turkey/Ham for sandwiches and/or peanut butter and jelly
  • Sandwich bread, tortillas, or pitas
  • Lettuce, tomato, pickles, onions
  • Condiments (ketchup, mayo, etc.)
  • Carrot and/or celery sticks, apple slices

 

Breakfast 

  • Cold cereals and/or instant oatmeal
  • Milk (for cereal and/or coffee & tea)
  • Yogurt
  • Hard-boiled eggs (cooked at home)
  • Applesauce
  • Cereal or granola bars
  • Fresh fruit
  • Nuts, sunflower seeds, craisins/raisins

 

Dinner 

  • Beef or Turkey burgers, hot dogs
  • Buns
  • Lettuce, tomato, onions, pickles, avocado, & other toppings
  • Fresh veggies (cooked in a foil pouch)
  • Corn on the cob w/butter
  • Baked beans
  • Basic salad (lettuces, tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots, peppers, etc.)
  • Salad dressing
  • Carrot and/or celery sticks
  • Hummus
  • Watermelon/Apple Slices

 

Suggested Shopping List

(Based on a family of 4, adjust as needed)  You may spend $50-100 on groceries & supplies for a family of 4

Dairy

  • ½ -1 gal milk and/or milk alternatives
  • ½ pound butter
  • 12 cheese slices
  • 4 6oz yogurts
  • 4-6 eggs

 

Produce

  • 4-6 apples
  • 4-6 oranges
  • 4-6 bananas
  • 1 lb baby carrots
  • 1 celery bunch
  • 1 lb broccoli, cauliflower and/or zucchini
  • 4 corn cobs
  • 1 head of lettuce
  • 2 medium tomatoes
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 green peppers
  • 2-3 avocados
  • 1 medium watermelon

 

Meat

  • 4-6 burgers (beef, turkey, or veggie)
  • 4-6 hot dogs
  • 1 lb sliced lunch meat (turkey, ham, etc.)

Bakery

  • 4-8 burger buns
  • 4-8 hot dog buns
  • 1 loaf sliced bread
  • 6-8 tortillas or pitas

 

Groceries

  • 1 box cold cereal
  • 1 box instant oatmeal
  • 1 jar peanut butter
  • 1 jar jelly
  • 3oz raisins
  • 6oz mixed nuts and/or seeds
  • 6-8 snack/cereal bars
  • 1-2 cans baked beans
  • 10-12oz hummus
  • 1 jar applesauce

 

Condiments

  • 1 jar sliced pickles
  • 1 bottle salad dressing
  • 1 bottle ketchup
  • 1 bottle mustard
  • 1 can olive oil spray (for cooking)
  • Seasonings as desired (i.e., salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, cinnamon)

 

Paper & Other Goods

  • Trash bags
  • Aluminum foil
  • Cling wrap
  • Plastic storage bags/containers (for leftovers, storage, & travel)
  • Paper towels
  • Napkins
  • Shopping bags/boxes (for packing and transporting food items)
  • Cooler(s)
  • ICE (Lots of ICE!!!)

 

Equipment List

Clothing

  • Good walking shoes or hiking boots
  • Casual shoes/Water Sandals
  • Socks (bring extras)
  • Long pants
  • Shorts
  • Long-sleeved shirt
  • Short-sleeved shirt
  • Underwear
  • Pajamas
  • Jacket/sweatshirt for cool nights
  • Rain jacket
  • Flip flops for shower
  • Bathing Suit

 

Bedding/sleeping

  • Tent, tent stakes
  • Tent repair kit
  • Tent rug
  • Sleeping pad/mattress
  • Sleeping bags, sheets
  • Extra blankets
  • Pillow

 

Personal

  • Water bottle (for each camper)
  • Toothbrush/toothpaste
  • Towel
  • Wash cloth
  • Deodorant
  • Soap
  • Shampoo
  • Lip balm
  • Hat
  • Sunglasses
  • Sunscreen
  • Insect repellant
  • Personal medications

 

Kitchen items

  • Food
  • Water
  • Cooler(s) and ice
  • Pots and pans for cooking
  • Cast-iron skillet (optional)
  • Sharp knife
  • Eating utensils (forks, knives, spoons)
  • Cooking utensils (spatula, tongs, etc.)
  • Paper towels
  • Can opener
  • Re-sealable plastic bags
  • Cling wrap
  • Aluminum foil
  • Trash bags
  • Matches or lighter

 

Miscellaneous & Optional

  • Camera w/extra batteries
  • Flashlight/headlamps w/extra batteries
  • Daypacks/fanny packs
  • Pocket knife (adults only)
  • Binoculars
  • First Aid kit
  • Bicycles and helmets
  • Personal fishing gear
  • Book
  • Musical instruments

 

Conclusion

This completes the Tent Camping Essentials List.  Do you have other items that are not on this list? Let me know. Or, if there are other experiences you would like to add- please feel free to comment.  If you need any of this content in a different format- please email me : mistyoutdoorsinaz@gmail.com.

 

AMAZON ASSOCIATES DISCLOSURE

AZ Camping Experience is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Staying Warm on Cold Camping Nights

posted in: Camping Recreation | 0

 

Love to camp, but don’t like the cold while you’re trying to sleep?  Over time, I have learned hacks that keep me toasty warm while sleeping- even when it’s below freezing temps.

 

These are things that have worked for me- depending on the temperature and your preferences, you may want to incorporate some or all of them.

 

*Wear long johns (aka thermals) under your sleep wear.

 

*Put on dry socks before you get into your sleeping bag.  Do not go to bed with the sweaty smelly socks that you’ve been wearing throughout the day.  I always bring several pair of Merino Wool Socks with me camping.  When it’s really cold- I will double my socks and place a toe warmer between my socks on each foot.

 

*Sleep in a stocking cap; you’ll be amazed at just how much heat you lose off your head.  It is also more comfortable to wear a hat than to try to cover your head in the sleeping bag.  This is especially not good if you get claustrophobic easily.

 

*Sleeping in gloves  will also help you stay warm during the night.  I make sure that I bring gloves on every camping trip- my kids wear them as well and it makes a huge difference.  Also- it’s nice to be able to put your gloves on in between waking up and before the camp fire gets going.

 

*Bring an extra comforter/blanket to throw over your family will hold the heat and keep everyone much warmer as well.

 

*Make sure you have warm bedding: Buy sleeping bags with the necessary lower-limit temperature rating and insulated, closed cell foam sleeping pads if possible.

 

*Use a hot water bottle: If you put a hot, non-insulated stainless-steel water bottle in your sleeping bag at night, you will feel like it’s your personal sauna. Place your water heater next to your core, inner thigh (near your femoral artery), and/or  your neck (near your jugular).

 

How the body loses heat

  • Evaporation causes a cooling effect. 85% of  heat can be lost through the body through sweating during exercise. Clothes that are wet from sweating and increased respiration also trigger a drop in body heat.
  • Radiation is another factor- it can cause  heat to move away from the body. Your body could lose more than 50%  heat at temperatures lower than 68°F (20°C).
  • Conduction- transfer of heat from When there is physical contact, a transfer of heat occurs. Conduction begins at 68°F (20°C) , and is the reason the body loses heat from sleeping on the cold ground. This is why having a quality sleeping pad is so important.
  • Convection occurs when a heated fluid moves away from a source. Take hot tea for instance- The rising steam coming off of the cup demonstrates the movement of heat as hot water transitions into gaseous water (wet steam).

 

So next time you go camping- you will know exactly what to do to stay nice and warm.  Have other tricks that you’ve used? Please leave a comment below!

Indian Hollow

posted in: Arizona Campgrounds, Camping in AZ | 0

Picture courtesy of the Kaibab National Forest

 

Indian Hollow is located on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and sits at an elevation of 6,300 feet. This first come, first serve campground is open year round and is used primarily as a Trailhead camping spot. The Thunder River Trail 23 is 15 miles which leads into the Grand Canyon.  This campground also makes a great starting point to explore the Kaibab Plateau and other various forest trails.

Need to Know

  • 3 Tent and RV sites up to 32 feet- no hook ups
  • Dispersed Camping
  • No cell Service
  • 1 Vault Toilet
  • No water

Getting there

Starting from Fredonia, you’ll drive about 1 mile east on US Highway 89, and then turn right on Forest Road 22. 30 miles- turn right onto Forest Road 425.  G

How to Book/Resources

Campground Website: Indian Hollow Campground

Contact Kaibab National Forest  (928) 643-7395 or visit their website.

 

Virgin River Campground

posted in: Adventure, Camping in AZ | 0

Located in the Virgin River Gorge between the Beaver Dam and the Virgin Mountains, this campground sits at an elevation of 1900 feet.  The narrow corridor within the Paiute Wilderness makes it an excellent base for hiking and exploring.  If you are not camping- and need to rest on your road trip, this place makes for a spectacular spot for a day picnic as well.

 

Amenities

  • 75 Tent and RV Sites- No hookups (7 sites have shade shelter)
  • Water (TBD)
  • Hiking Trails
  • Limit Stay:  14 Days ($8 per site (up to 2 vehicles), Day use Fee-$2 per vehicle
  • Paved access road and pull through parking
  • Drinking water, flush toilets (ADA compliant)
  • Self pay box- and campground host (occasionally)

Getting there

Starting from Littlefield, go 16 miles N on I-15 and then take the Cedar Pockets Exit.

How to Book

Contact the Bureau of Land Management (435) 688-3200 or visit their website.

**Please note according to the BLM, this campground is closed until August 31, 2019***